The best aesthetic treatments for all ages from your 20s to 60s

What you can do to keep looking your best, regardless of your age.

In your 20’s

This is the time to start a skincare regimen with effective results. Look for products that contain high antioxidants, peptides, retinol, and use them with a daily sunscreen of at least SPF 30 to prevent further sun damage.

Gentle laser treatments, like Clear + Brilliant, are great for young skin.

Lasers can address pigmentation and increase skin porosity, so you get the most from your products.

Collagen-boosting treatments like microneedling will also make a long term difference making the skin healthier and more resilient and looking extra plump and glowy.

It’s likely that you won’t need any structural filler in your 20’s however you may want to add some volume to your lips with dermal fillers.


Clear + Brilliant / $350 per session including Healite II Tretament
SkinPen® Microneedling / $350 per session
Plump Lips / $399 1 ml Premium Dermal Filler

 

In your 30’s

The first signs of ageing will appear unexpectedly and often around the eyes, forehead, and mouth/lip area.

To maintain your look we may recommend treatments such as:

Microneedling – to improve the overall tone, minimise sunspots, and promote collagen production for healthy, bright and smooth skin.

Chemical peels – to brighten skintone, increase skin tightening and improve the overall skin tone and texture.

Wrinkle Relaxers – to treat fine lines and proactively prevent the formation of deeper lines by limiting the muscle movements that cause wrinkles.

Treatments like laser resurfacing can effectively combat the early signs of skin sagging and laxity.


SkinPen® Microneedling / $350 per session
Mesoestetic Chemical peels / from $110 each
Wrinkle Relaxers / from $180 per area
Laser Resurfacing / $350 per session

 

In your 40’s

Due to a decrease in collagen production and other natural structural elements, you may notice a loss of volume and reduced elasticity in the face.

Since cell turnover also slows down in your 40’s, your skin may also begin to lose some of its natural glow, resulting in a duller complexion.

Treatments to look for:

Wrinkle Relaxers, to reduce lines and give a smoother look.

Dermal fillers can minimise the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and counteract the visible signs of volume loss by adding contour to the face to recreate the fuller look of younger skin.

Radio Frequency to counteract the loss of skin’s natural structure and stimulates the skin’s production of collagen and elastin, and can be administered on the face and body.

While gentle lasers are still effective, more aggressive laser treatments like laser resurfacing may produce better results in your 40’s for improving the tone of skin and reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.


Wrinkle Relaxers / from $180 per area
Dermal Fillers / from $550
INFINI Radio Frequency + Microneedling / $600 per session
Laser Resurfacing / $350 per session

 

In your 50’s

When we reach our 50’s we continue to see loss of volume in the face and skin laxity becomes more pronounced.

As the face begins to sag overall, jowls can appear with the falling of the jawline and cheeks.

Lines can start to appear around the lips and we tend to lose lip volume.

Sun exposure and smoking can speed up the development of lines so make sure you are wearing high factor sunscreen.

Treatments to consider in your 50’s:

Volumising dermal fillers, especially in the mid-face/cheek area to correct volume loss and lift the jowls.

Wrinkle Relaxers for the treatment of lines and wrinkles in the face and neck.

Collagen stimulators not only corrects wrinkles and folds but also stimulates your own collagen production to really treat the underlying causes of facial ageing. The effects are gradual and longer-lasting giving you a natural youthful appearance.

Thread lifting, a ‘non-surgical’ face and neck lift treatment using sutures such as Silhouette Soft to lift and tighten the skin by stimulating new collagen production, reducing wrinkles, tightening pores and creating volume.

Erbium resurfacing lasers: These more aggressive lasers can combat the increasing signs of sun damage and improve overall skin texture.

Radio Frequency, a non-invasive procedure to tighten and lift the skin on the face and neck, making it a good alternative to a traditional facelift. It relies on Radio Frquency to deliver its collagen-boosting treatment resulting in tighter, smoother and more lifted skin.


Wrinkle Relaxers / from $180 per area
Dermal Fillers / from $550
Collagen stimulators / from $800
Sillhouette Soft Thread Lift / from $1,200
INFINI Radio Frequency + Microneedling / $600 per session
Laser Resurfacing / $350 per session

 

In your 60’s

Some women select surgical options (blepharoplasty, facelift, necklift) to address age-related concerns and bring more youthful contours back to the face, but you can also restore volume to your face with a variety of nonsurgical treatments.

Wrinkle Relaxers. The aim is to soften the lines helping look fresher and rested. Anti-wrinkle injections can be also used to treat upper lip lines and to prevent the mouth corners from downturning.

Dermal fillers to replace the volume that has been lost. Volume loss causes marionette lines to form, the cheeks to flatten and for you to develop nasolabialfolds.

We aim to correct this volume loss and revert the shape of the face towards the inverted triangle that was present in your younger years.

Collagen stimulators to stimulate the formation of your own collagen for subtle, but noticeable results. They are injected deep in the dermal layer to reinforce your skin’s structure and to restore fullness and face contours.

The Silhouette Soft Thread lift (non-surgical facelift) is a minimally invasive treatment to redefine facial contours and combat sagging skin with immediate results.

If you aren’t a candidate for a facelift, you can still undergo a facial rejuvenation procedure using a skin resurfacing treatment that can smooth out lines and wrinkles, and also improve the texture and tone of your skin.


Wrinkle Relaxers / from $180 per area
Dermal Fillers / from $550
Collagen stimulators / from $800
Sillhouette Soft Thread Lift / from $1,200
Laser Resurfacing / $350 per session

 

How can I get started?

Every clients’ facial muscles and facial anatomy are different and therefore require a unique approach, so each service is completely customised. Our highly skilled and experienced Talent will address your skin concerns with specially tailored treatment programs, designed just for you. We are all about education, budget and making sure clients are fully aligned with the treatment plan.

To achieve the perfect result our Doctors analyse the entire face and consider your facial proportions ensuring a natural result.

Get started today by booking a complimentary consultation with our  talent / BOOK NOW.

Ready to get started?

For a complimentary consultation, or to book in for a treatment, call SKYN 08 9389 9022 or request an appointment online.

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We Review INFINI Non-Surgical Facial Rejuvenation

Non-surgical facial rejuvenation technologies have ramped up several notches with the introduction of INFINI, and a clinical study claiming it is up to 49 percent as effective as a surgical facelift.

As little as 10 years ago the answer to sagging facial contours and wrinkled, lax skin was a choice between the scalpel or acceptance that you’re not in the elite few able to edit the uncontrollable parts of themselves that triggered diffidence. Then non-surgical rejuvenation technologies came along and revolutionised the cosmetic industry.

Devices harnessing energy sources such as light (laser), radiofrequency and ultrasound allowed consumers to achieve a firmer, brighter appearance without the invasiveness of surgery, its expense and the healing downtime involved.

This, in turn, allowed them to prolong the need for cosmetic plastic surgery (if that was ever on their radar) or avoid it altogether.

Now non-surgical facial rejuvenation has ramped up several notches with INFINI, a treatment described as “3D Micro-Needling Fractional Radio Frequency (MFR)”.

A CLINICAL STUDY CONDUCTED AMONG 499 PARTICIPANTS IN FIVE COUNTRIES SHOWED THAT INFINI COULD BE UP TO 49 PERCENT AS EFFECTIVE AS A SURGICAL FACELIFT.

When asked to trial Infini at cosmetic plastic surgeon Dr Darryl Hodgkinson’s Sydney clinic (the first in Australia with the technology), I wasn’t exactly skeptical but, as a specialist writer in cosmetic restoration for more than five years (and with a great personal interest in subject for years prior to that), I have heard my share of extravagant product claims.

I have also had a number of non-surgical facial firming/rejuvenating treatments over the years. While they certainly made a difference, it was of the subtle kind that attracted comments from others like “you look well – have you been on holidays?” rather than seeing it for myself in the mirror. Because the improvements are gradual, over a period of 3-6 months as collagen in the dermis is regenerated, it’s hard to see these changes for yourself.

AFTER THE FIRST SESSION OF INFINI (TWO DOWN, ONE TO GO), I BEGAN TO NOTICE DISTINCT IMPROVEMENTS WITHIN ABOUT TWO WEEKS.

It wasn’t that I was staring in the mirror watching for results – it was catching random glimpses of myself in glass reflections (the latter are way worse than mirrors as they tend to exaggerate every groove and depression. Or maybe they just tell the plainer truth!).

The hollows under my eyes appeared less … well … hollow, my jawline seemed firmer and my mouth corners not so ☹. In the mirror, my skin looked fresher. Llnes weren’t as pronounced around my eyes and pigmented patches were lighter. Overall my complexion looked and felt more hydrated and it absorbed product more effectively.

MY SKIN IS DEFINITELY IMPROVING ALL THE TIME AND I STILL HAVE ONE SESSION TO GO. I’M TOLD I’LL SEE OPTIMAL RESULTS 3-6 MONTHS AFTER MY FINAL TREATMENT.

One not-so-great by-product is that the intensive process of cell renewal generated by Infini seems to have dislodged all the murky stuff that lay beneath and brought it to the surface. For about a month I was getting breakouts, particularly around my chin and lip area. I’m told this is a good thing and a sign Infini is doing its work. Thankfully the eruptions have now subsided but I delayed my final Infini treatment as a result.

So, what is INFINI?

Non-surgical rejuvenation technologies using radiofrequency (RF) heat the dermis (the second of the skin’s three layers) to stimulate the production of new collagen and, so, renew and tighten the skin. Because RF doesn’t affect the epidermis (surface of the skin) there’s no way of telling what effect it is having underneath if the setting is too high – until it’s too late and the patient is burnt.

By using a “micro-needling” handpiece that creates fractional micro-holes in epidermis, higher levels of RF can be delivered to the dermis with more predictable results than RF used alone. Micro-needling is also well documented to generate production of new collagen in its own right.

This all means more dramatic results. It also meant my face was left beetroot red immediately after treatment, and it took up to a day for the red-pink blush to fully subside. But more of that in shortly…

What does an INFINI treatment involve?

I was told there could be pain or discomfort, but I’ve heard that before. Yeah, yeah. yeah. I consider myself an aficionado of these treatments and, combined with extensive corrective dental work over the years, have a high pain threshold.

So maybe I was just too cocky. I won’t lie…it hurt. Quite a bit.

After two applications of numbing cream at 20-minute intervals, Hannah, my designated therapist, got down to biz. There were to be three “passes” over my face and upper neck of decreasing intensity. Hannah started on my forehead and worked down (with extra attention to the droopiest and most lined areas), along systematic lines. On each “line” there were up to five short, sharp pulses of micro-needles delivering RF.

Each pulse of the first “pass” jolted me and I asked for micro-breaks. The second pass was easier and by the third it was bearable. It was all over in about 30 minutes.

Redness is an oft-cited side effect of skin rejuvenation treatments. I’ve rarely suffered any but in this case it was no lie, either. My face was bright red (mainly the result of the micro-needling) but fortunately the clinic recommended Synergie Minerals’ Mineralwhip Antioxidant Cream Foundation as the ultimate post-procedure cover-up. Although light and silky, it covered the redness so no one could tell I’d had anything done. I went straight on to a meeting.

My skin was still a bit red, then pink for a day after each of my two sessions so far and felt somewhat dry and flaky for up to a week.

Is INFINI for you?

Dr Hogdkinson says Infini is ideal for those concerned by moderate signs of facial drooping and skin laxity who aren’t ready for, or want to avoid cosmetic surgery.

“However, if a patient has passed a certain point, I will recommend they save their money for when they are ready to have a surgical rejuvenation procedure,” he says. “Otherwise they will be wasting their money and I don’t condone that.”

Although I found Infini … uncomfortable … I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it in light of the results I have achieved so far. No pain, no gain as the cliché goes.

I would, however, advise accepting the offer of a pre-procedure painkiller or sedative (in that event, make sure you have a lift organised home, or get a taxi)!

You don’t have to go the “whole hog”, either, as I did. Patients can have either the superficial RF or the micro-needling as individual treatments. This is ideal for younger patients and those who just want a subtle boost.

Ready to get started?

For complimentary consultation, or to book in for a treatment, call SKYN 08 9389 9022 or request an appointment online.

INFINI

VIA: shesaid.com

A Guide to Lasers and What’s Right For Your Skin

A board-certified dermatologist and clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the NYU School of Medicine, Dr. Robert Anolik is a prominent cosmetic dermatologist and researcher in New York whose knowledge of and experience with the newest skin-improving technologies in multiple areas of dermatology—from lasers to radiofrequency to Wrinkle Relaxers  and fillers—is enormous. Beyond being a goop favorite, he’s a recipient of Elle Magazine’s Genius Award (they dubbed him “The Techie”), and a Rising Star in the New York Times Magazine “New York Super Doctors” feature, he’s quoted often in the consumer press, the author of numerous academic articles, and lectures frequently on the subject of laser surgery, cosmetic dermatology, and Mohs surgery. Here, he explains which laser does what, along with how best to address common skin issues, from aging to rosacea:

A Q&A with Robert Anolik, M.D.

Q

Are there anti-wrinkle lasers, per se? Which are best for for skin texture issues? Do you believe that lasers are the best approach for crepe-iness?

A

In general, lasers that remodel collagen and stimulate collagen production throughout the dermis of the skin improve the appearance of wrinkles, texture, and crepe-iness. This is because the first two relate to weakening or irregular conformations of the dermal collagen, while the latter is a result of thinning of the dermal collagen. Remodeled and new collagen normalizes this layer so that it is more organized, more even in distribution, and deeper in depth.

There is a surprising misconception that lasers take off the top layers of skin, leaving it white, and/or shiny/thinned. This is not the case. I suspect this mistaken patient belief relates to older methods of rejuvenation like dermabrasion, deep chemical peels, and old-fashioned lasers, all of which did remove surface layers of skin and carried a risk of removing all normal pigment cells called melanocytes. (Today, I still see patients in the office who were treated in the 80s, 90s, and early 2000s with these older methods, and some do have these unusual signs of treatment.)

Fortunately, rejuvenating lasers today generally penetrate the surface skin, stimulating the collagen from within and below and triggering its production, rather than simply shearing off the surface. This is because resurfacing lasers today are fractional—meaning that the laser beam is delivered in a pixelated manner, touching the skin in tiny dots, separated by areas of untreated skin. This leaves behind healthy pigment producing cells (melanocytes) and other normal skin cells unaffected by the treatment that rapidly heal the skin and markedly diminish the risk of abnormal pigmentation.

“There is a surprising misconception that lasers take off the top layers of skin, leaving it white, and/or shiny/thinned. This is not the case.”

The most commonly used lasers for these strategies are fractional resurfacing lasers. The most popular ones are those with limited downtime (generally from a few hours of pink and dryness to 4-5 days of pink and dryness). My currently used strategies include the non-ablative (non-wounding) Clear and Brilliant lasers and Fraxel Restore dual lasers. Not only do these lasers stimulate the collagen, they also allow for a surface exfoliation of the skin, which sheds abnormal browning and dullness to the skin. Consequently, the skin looks brighter.

The stronger lasers are ablative (meaning they superficially wound the skin), leaving the skin with redness and scabs for about a week, followed by 3-4 weeks of pink skin. The later 3-4 weeks can generally be masked with makeup, since the skin has healed. These stronger versions are usually reserved for more substantial signs of aging, uneven texture, deep wrinkling, or scars—often acne scars. My preferred ablative fractional laser is Fraxel Repair.

More good news about these therapies: I was part of a clinical trial published in 2012 that demonstrated the likelihood that these newer fractional laser treatments promote not just more beautiful skin, but healthier skin as well, by supporting the elimination of pre-cancerous skin changes known as actinic keratoses. These precancers have the potential to turn into squamous cell carcinomas.

“I was part of a clinical trial published in 2012 that demonstrated the likelihood that these newer fractional laser treatments promote not just more beautiful skin, but healthier skin as well, by supporting the elimination of pre-cancerous skin changes known as actinic keratoses.”

Finally, there is a very new method of collagen stimulation that benefits wrinkles, texture, and crepe-iness. It’s so new I imagine most people are not yet familiar with it: picosecond laser technology. It first appeared after the FDA approval for picosecond laser treatment of pigment, most notably tattoos. (It is called the Cynosure PicoSure laser, and the one I use in my office.) When I say picosecond technology, what I’m referring to is the rate at which laser energy is delivered to the skin. In this case, a beam of light at a certain energy is delivered within a picosecond, an extraordinarily rapid rate. I participated in clinical trials that studied the effects of these picosecond lasers when passing through a specialized diffractive lens. The lens ultimately delivered areas of peak energy and low energy, almost like a fractional laser, but there was always some low level of energy touching the surface of the skin. There are a number of theories as to why this laser technology helps remodel and produce collagen. One of the most interesting to me is that the rapid delivery of laser light might stimulate a vibration throughout the surface of the skin, triggering the collagen response. I have since been a part of publications and lectures describing the clinical trials we performed. What makes this science all the more interesting—and desirable for our patients—is the limited downtime. Usually the skin is just a bit pink for a few hours after treatment.

Q

Which lasers fight redness and promote skin evenness?

A

Redness on the skin is caused by a number of things, including sun damage, genetics, hormones, and rosacea. Topical treatments include prescription drugs that are able to limit some underlying inflammation, like metronidazole creams and azeleic acids gels and sulfacetamide lotions. But the most effective method of reducing facial redness is laser therapy. The underlying concept is that specific laser wavelengths can be delivered to the skin in order to heat and eliminate blood vessels while leaving the surrounding skin structures (hair, collagen, pigment, etc.) untouched. These blood vessels are simply cosmetic nuisances—we are not eliminating medically important structures.

The gold standard of redness reduction for years has been the pulsed dye laser (example: VBeam laser). It’s so effective that we can use it to eliminate port wine stain birthmarks (like the one on Gorbachev’s forehead). I most often use it for redness reduction stemming from the common causes mentioned earlier but also port wine stains as well as the redness of scars (sometimes acne-related, or surgical or traumatic). Each condition should be treated differently; an expert cosmetic dermatologist will know which parameters and strategies are best used to treat different targets.

“It’s so effective that we can use it to eliminate port wine stain birthmarks (like the one on Gorbachev’s forehead).”

Newer lasers have emerged that complement these treatments—and can sometimes be the primary laser choice. These include KTP lasers (example: ExcelV laser). These lasers give us two different wavelengths of light that are distinct from pulsed dye lasers. These newer wavelengths can often better target the larger blood vessels that look like red lines/squiggles or blue paths on the face (google “telangiectasia” and “periorbital vein” to see examples of what I mean).

When I treat a patient’s redness, I look for both diffuse redness as well as more pronounced red/blue capillaries. Patients with redness usually have both. For these patients, I use both a pulsed dye laser and a KTP laser on the same day to achieve optimal redness reduction. It’s a very tolerable treatment, and feels like rubber band snaps over the face. Unpleasant but not painful. It usually only lasts a few seconds and the downtime is usually just a few hours of looking blotchy pink. Many of my patients don’t bother with makeup to hide the appearance, but patients can put makeup on afterwards if they feel it’s very obvious.

Q

Which are best for tightening and fighting sagging?

A

The sciences that allow cosmetic dermatologists to tighten (i.e. fight sagging) skin is one of the fastest growing areas in our field. I am involved in a number of clinical trials using these technologies, and there are several very interesting strategies that seem to be improving daily.

It’s important to understand that not all technologies are lasers. Lasers are beams of light that are simply one wavelength. Other forms of energy can be used on the field of cosmetic dermatology, including radiofrequency and ultrasound.

Radiofrequency was one of the first technologies to help tighten skin. A popular system is Thermage. With this science, we can safely deliver radiofrequency energy into the skin to produce a heat throughout the underlying collagen fibers. This can stimulate remodeling of existing collagen and the production of new collagen. The result is a tightening/firming to the skin. This used to be a painful treatment, but innovations in delivery make it very comfortable. These strategies include vibration in the handpiece that touches the skin as well as cooling methods to comfort the surface skin.

“It allows me to safely deliver sound waves under the skin that focus to points at very specific depths. Think of the way a magnifying lens can take sunlight, focus that light onto a leaf, and leave a burn.”

Ultrasound is one of the newer technologies used in skin tightening and lifting. One of the popular systems in Ulthera. It allows me to safely deliver sound waves under the skin that focus to points at very specific depths. Think of the way a magnifying lens can take sunlight, focus that light onto a leaf, and leave a burn. With Ultherapy, ultrasound can pass right through the skin surface painlessly, but be focused to meet at a specific point at a specific depth under the skin. At this meeting point, the temperature goes up, stimulating collagen remodeling and collagen production. This procedure tends to be uncomfortable, but like the Thermage science, has become more comfortable with strategies that include lower energy delivery with more passes of the sound waves.

Finally, it’s important to realize that cosmetic injections of Wrinkle Relaxers and filler also allow me to lift skin. With Wrinkle Relaxers , I am able to strategically place it into muscles that have a downward pull. These muscles include those immediately below the forehead and above the eye. Ideal placement here gives people a noticeable brow lift. (Don’t worry about spock eyebrows— these are prevented by delicate placement of Wrinkle Relaxers  in the forehead!) Wrinkle Relaxers  can also be used in the chin to lift the corners of the mouth. And it can be injected into the neck to allow a lift to the jowls and neck bands.

“In the hands of someone other than an expert doctor, filler results in a full face—which is not the goal of filler.”

Filler injections also give the face a lift. In the hands of someone other than an expert doctor, filler results in a full face—which is not the goal of filler. True appreciation for the placement of filler allows contour and lift. Injections underneath facial muscles and in areas where the young face once had more significant, supportive bone and fat pads, give a natural-looking lift. No one will know you were treated, but the face is re-contoured and lifted to prevent the appearance of sagging skin and jowls.

While these techniques are very exciting and becoming more popular, I cannot say that we can achieve the lifting outcomes of surgery. But it also doesn’t carry the risks, scars, or permanency of surgery. Also, I theorize that remodeling and production of new collagen in the skin will slow the rate at which your skin sags over time, since the architecture of the skin is newer and healthier with these treatments.

Please note some of what is described above is off-label by the FDA but used routinely.

Q

What’s best treatment for dark spots?

A

The best treatment for dark spots is, without question, laser treatment once the spots appear. Topical products are helpful, but most helpful in eliminating the development of brown spots. Consistent use of sunscreen and retinoids helps maintain even, bright tone, while hydroquinone specifically diminishes pigment in any area you are treating. It is reasonable to use a hydroquinone to select areas once you start to see an area of unevenness developing; I review exhaustively with my patients that if they elect to use hydroquinone, that they need to be careful with the application. If it goes outside of the area of extra pigment, there may be a whitening at the rim of the normal skin.

The best laser treatments for dark spots fall into two major categories: pigment specific lasers and fractional resurfacing lasers. Pigment specific lasers are spot treatment therapies. They are used on one spot at a time and work by selectively heating the extra pigment particles in the target area. The names of these lasers are variable, but most commonly include Ruby lasers, Yag lasers, and Alexandrite lasers. Typically, the treated areas on the face appear as tiny surface scabs for several days to a week. So planning the right time for these treatments is important, since you may have several days of looking treated, even with makeup.

“The best treatment for dark spots is, without question, laser treatment once the spots appear.”

The other category, namely fractional resurfacing lasers, primarily build collagen in the skin, but also exfoliate the surface. There are many intensities of these lasers, from ones that leave the skin pink and dry for a few hours, to one that leaves it looking superficially wounded for a week and pink for another 3-4 weeks. The stronger lasers are usually used only for patients with dramatically spotty or wrinkled skin; most patients do great with options that leave them pink and dry for a few hours and pink and dry for a few days.

The best treatment overall here is combination therapy. To achieve the optimal outcomes, I encourage all of my patients to protect their skin daily with sunscreen—even in winter and rainy days—and if their skin can tolerate it, retinol or prescription retinoids on a nightly basis. I say if they can tolerate it because the use of retinoids can make the skin irritated, but usually the skin becomes used to it, especially if the patient is moisturizing well. I use it nightly without any trouble. I then bring in the use of Ruby, Yag, and Alexandrite lasers for concentrated sun spots and fractional resurfacing lasers to diffusely exfoliate and brighten skin tone.

When my patients do this combination routinely, they are the ones people look at and say, “Wow, your skin is beautiful.”

Q

What are the best to treat acne?

A

We can use blue and red lights to assist with anti-inflammatory processes of acne. But what I find more effective is integrating light and vacuum benefits in a process called photopneumatic therapy. The system brand name I use is called Isolaz. The procedure involves steaming the skin followed by a handpiece applied to the skin that can pull excess oils out of the pores. Then the system delivers an intense pulsed light that can kill acne causing bacteria as well as assist in normalizing the pink and brown acne discoloration on the skin.

(Via goop)

Ready to get started?

For a no out-of-pocket expenses consultation, or to book in for a treatment, call SKYN 08 9389 9022 or request an appointment online.

How To Tighten Skin Without a Face Lift

“What’s revolutionary now in lifting/tightening/firming is the ability to stimulate multiple layers of skin, not just the surface layer,”

“The surface layer reveals many signs of aging, like fine lines, discoloration, blood vessels, sun spots, acne scars, etc. But it’s the remodeling of deep to surface collagen layers that lift and tighten.”

Until recently, the ways to tighten skin were either mild—stimulating collagen in the very top layers of skin with treatments like peels, retinoids, and certain kinds of lasers—or severe—CO2 peels or pulling the skin tight with a surgical facelift, both of which involve downtime and a greater amount of risk.

Many people who might’ve gotten a facelift in the past are now opting for dermatological treatments instead

or at least forestalling the need for one, says Santa Monica dermatologist Karyn Grossman: “A very detailed consultation is so important—you have to weigh so many considerations.” She mentions downtime, risk, cost, durability (how long the effects are going to last), severity (in terms of the resulting look), and potential scars as factors (Dr. Grossman also wrote this piece for us on aging well.)

Less invasive therapies are making huge strides, in any case. “I feel confident we are delaying the need for surgical tightening procedures, says Anolik. “This is not to say some people don’t need plastic surgery—I regularly recommend patients for it—but this is a way of looking and feeling younger with much less downtime.” Injectible fillers temporarily replace lost collagen a little deeper in the skin: Dermatologists inject a filler along, say, the cheekbone, and the volume it creates pulls up the skin below. This sort of lifting has its limits, and is easy to overdo, but can also really help. Another approach, threading, lifts with physical threads that bind to the tissues of the face and stimulate collagen growth there. “I’ve seen great results with the new threading,” notes Day. Grossman is excited about the new threads: “Reports from friends abroad have shown good results—the combination of threading with other therapies like Thermage [see below] will add a whole new frontier to minimally invasive procedures.”

The biggest non-invasive technological breakthroughs are in radiofrequency and ultrasound devices, which build collagen by sending energy to different layers of the skin, radiofrequency in a broad, diffuse way, and ultrasound in a deeper, targeted way. “Think of the collagen fibers as a loose-knit sweater, and these treatments tighten that sweater,” says Anolik. Both usually require skin-numbing but have no downtime because they work beneath the top layer of skin; significant results develop over a period of months as the body grows the new collagen. “Ulthera is the backbone of most of the tightening I do,” says Day, who supplements it with radiofrequency treatments like EndyMed and Thermage. “I find the EndyMed treatments make the effects of the Ulthera last longer.” Grossman considers Thermage her gold standard for tightening but feels Ulthera is equally effective; Anolik prefers Ulthera but uses Thermage in certain situations.

Grossman says she gets incredible upper-eye tightening results with Thermage treatments, and prefers another radiofrequency device called Forma, which requires multiple sessions, for fullness in the lower eye area. She also loves Thermage for the neck; Anolik likes combine Ulthera withWrinkle Relaxers—done a week before or after the Ulthera. “If I’m trying to lift the brow or the neck, but see muscle pull that is countering an upwards direction, then combining the process with Wrinkle Relaxers can be very helpful,” he says. “It helps create an optimal environment for unencumbered lifting.” Day likes Thermage for tightening the stomach and hips, and prefers Endymed for lifting the eye.

Microneedling technology combines with radiofrequency in several new devices. EndyMed makes an Intensif version of its radiofrequency device that uses microneedles to help remodel and build collagen. “What’s great with the EndyMed device is I can dial up or down the depth of the needles depending on the patient,” says Day. “It’s not a bloody procedure—there’s very little downtime. It’s reliable, it works on skin of color, for smoker’s lines around the lips, and it really lifts around the eyes. I like it for acne scars, too.”

 

Another emerging device, Infini, combines radiofrequency that’s able to target specific points in the skin the way Ulthera does, with the collagen-enhancing action of microneedles. “It’s exciting, and new, but the results are also new,” says Anolik. “It looks really promising. The idea with microneedling is you’re triggering an immune response to stimulate collagen production.

 

Grossman, too, is excited about microneedling: “It has beautiful results in the neck, and recent studies have shown it may also improve cellulite on the back of the legs.”

 

If the many options sound like too much, Day thinks about it differently: “I think you get the best results doing a little of a lot of things—skincare, neuromodulators, diet, exercise, fillers, devices. It isn’t about going big in one particular area. We age in many different ways, and so It’s better to do a little of one thing and a little bit of another. It’s no longer about chasing wrinkles: Now we investigate the wrinkle.”

Book a Consultation for non-surgical facelift options at SKYN

For a no out-of-pocket expenses consultation, or to book in for a treatment, call SKYN 08 9389 9022 or request an appointment online.

INFINI Video

Most Frequently Asked Questions about Infini, RF Skin Tightening from Lutronic

By STEVENFWEINERMD

What makes Infini different than other RF devices?

The long answer can be found at myblog post.  The short answer is:  fractional not bulk heating, needles are insulated, needle depths are variable, coagulation occurs for maximal collagen stimulation, and the epidermis is safely protected from the heat.  This allows for a very safe treatment for all skin types, that is also very effective.


What long term complications have you (Dr. Weiner) seen?

With over 1000 treatments, I have seen no long term complications.  No skin atrophy, no unintended fat loss, no scarring, and no pigment changes.


How long does a treatment take?

With an experienced provider, the face treatment takes about 45 minutes, and if the neck is included, add another 15 minutes.


How long is recovery?

The initial redness subsides very rapidly in the first hour.  It takes about 24-36 hours to resolve, as does the swelling. Rarely, patients report extend redness for a few more days.


What are the restrictions after the Infini?

Skin care must be only the prescribed creams.  No make up until the morning and care with touching the skin with unclean hands or towels.  There are no activity or sun restrictions!


Is ice or steroids used after the treatment?

It is not recommended to use either of these after Infini. Although there is no data, it is Dr. Weiner’s opinion that the results can be compromised if ice or steroids are used. The results are dependant on inflammation, and “heat shock proteins”, both of which are inhibited with ice and steroids.


How many treatments are needed?

 Good question.  It is variable.  To get maximum benefit, the general consensus is 3.  Some people might be happy with only one, but that is uncommon.  Younger patients wanting only preventative treatments can get one yearly. Acne scarring clients should consider at least 3, and might be more satisfied with 5 or 6.


How long should I wait between treatments?

Consecutive treatments can be done as close as 3 or 4 weeks. If this is not possible because of your schedule, don’t worry, the final results are not affected.


How painful is the Infini?

Most patients will rate the majority of the procedure a 3 or 4/10.  The areas which might be higher are over the bone, such as the forehead, cheeks, and jawline.  We have recently implemented changes in technique to make all but the forehead more comfortable.  The forehead can be excluded if desired.  All patients report no discomfort when the procedure is complete.


Can the Infini be used on other parts of the body?

We routinely treat the neck and chest in conjunction with the face treatment.  Other areas we have treated are arm laxity, knee area, and scars from abdominal surgery.  Stretch marks have been treated but results are variable.  We have successfully treated hyperhidrosis with the Infini as well. Bottom line is that when appropriate depths and settings are used, the Infini can be used on all areas of the body.


How many passes are performed on each area?

Each area is treated at least with 3 depths and 2 passes for each depth.  Some areas area treated at 4 or 5 depths.


What patients would you exclude?

Very few patients wouldn’t be candidates.  Patients with pacemakers should not be treated.  If there is metal in an area of the face, the skin overlying this area can not be treated.  Patients on blood thinners can be treated but will get bruising.  We try to hold all thinners if it is possible prior to treatment.  Aspirin needs 12 days for it’s action to be completely reversed on the platelets.  Patients with severely sun damaged skin will theoretically respond less than a person with healthy skin.


Why is Infini safe for darker skin patients?

The Infini is protective of the epidermis, where the pigment cells are, because it’s needles are insulated. Also, the depth can be adjusted so the heat from the RF stays in the dermis, below the most superficial layer.  Other devices are either not insulated, or try to push heat through the skin, potentially damaging the pigment cells.


How does the Infini compare to lasers for treating acne scars?

The Infini is safer than a laser, with less downtime, and no risk to the eyes.  As stated above, the darker skin patients can be treated more safely with the Infini when compared to a laser because a laser will heat the upper layer of skin, the epidermis. Lasers have the risk of pigment changes (darker or lighter).  Results from Infini appear to be better than lasers for acne scars. It is postulated the the increased depths of the Infini (up to 3.5mm) vs lasers (maximum about 1.8mm) seems to the difference. Also, elastin is produced (elastinosis) in response to a RF treatment, and this is not the case in laser resurfacing.


How long do results last?

This is a difficult question and will be different for each patient.  The collagen created will last at least 7 years.  However, the amount of collagen is variable, and depends on the overall skin health, patient’s health, smoking habits, age, tanning, sun exposure, and lifestyle.  It is usually recommended to have a “touch up” performed every 12-18 months.

How can I get started?

Contact SKYN Perth and book your Appointment today, call 08 9389 9022, or